Eugene Weekly

 

A Moveable Feast? Redevelopment may swallow the Courthouse Garden (6.14.12)

Knee-deep in rows of leafy tomato and potato plants at the Courthouse Garden, Tom Ruck knows that the ground upon which he stands may soon host condominiums.From beneath his cap and bushy white brow, Ruck squints at the midday sun reflecting off the stainless-steel panels of the Wayne L. Morse United States Courthouse. December will mark the three-year anniversary of the garden and the expiration of the University of Oregon’s lease on the property. “It’s upsetting to think about all the work that has gone into this and just to stop like that … ” he says, scanning the urban bounty. “It was just a hole in the ground. Look at it now; it looks like a little piece of paradise.” Read more…

Six Americas of Literacy on Climate (6.14.12)

What image comes to mind when you hear the words “global warming”? Ice shelves crashing? Shrinking glaciers? Polar bears stranded on floating ice chunks? If you answered one of the above, i.e. melting ice, then you chose the most common response among Americans in a poll conducted by Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication. Leisorwitz, who received the UO’s first Ph.D. in environmental studies in 2003, returned to Eugene this spring to give a talk on “Climate Change in the American Mind” at the Many Nations Long House. Read more…

Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change (5.24.12)

An Athabascan woman holds up a blood-red salmon in a village on the Alaska Peninsula. With a gentle tug, she slides the fish’s skin off like sludge. The salmon, a major part of the village’s diet, had been overcome by Ichthyophonus hoferi, the microscopic parasite that is proliferating in Alaska’s warming rivers and tributaries. Read more…

Silence at Take Back the Night? (4.26.12)

Eugene’s 32rd Take Back the Night (TBTN)/ Recobrar la Noche may be unusually quiet this year due to the mandatory reporting policy implemented by UO last fall. The new guidelines state that all university workers are required to report cases of sexual assault reported to them to the Department of Public Safety, with or without the consent of the survivor. Read more…

Racism in the Kitchen (4.12.12)

“If you’ve ever been on the receiving end of a speculum — it sucks,” Breeze Harper said to a predominantly twenty-something audience at the UO on April 7. “But the speculum is this commodity that came out of the suffering of African American slavery.” Read more…

Princeton Physicist on Climate Change (4.5.12)

Perhaps one day the question posed by physicist Robert Socolow, “What would we do if we took climate change seriously?” will seem as absurd and archaic as “What would we do if we took the idea the planets revolved around the sun seriously?” For now Socolow, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University, has a lot of work to do. Read more…

Bitches on the Boob Tube (3.29.12)

Has TV regressed in its portrayal of the working woman? With TV’s spring lineup kicking off, there may be hope for contemporary portrayals of working women on TV. So where do Murphy Brown,Roseanne and Murder She Wrote fit into this picture? Read more…

The Value of Vets (6.9.11)

Rape. Shame. SOS. Black Hole. Self Blame. Abnormal Terror. Faceless. Hundreds of T-shirts howl with the painful memories of veterans who were sexually assaulted while serving. One shirt bleeds crimson paint from a red splatter over the heart and is emblazoned: øAttempted rape by my Commanding Officer.” Another T-shirts slogan wails, Sexual Assault Scars for Life.” Sonja Fry, a licensed clinical social worker with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in Eugene, pulls shirt after shirt out of a bin in her office. Read more…

A World That Is, A World That Never Was (11.18.10)

The pseudo-historical fantasy world of steampunk grows in response to modern life.

Swish. Tap. Stomp. Bustled silk skirts whirl and tailcoats flap. Wooden floorboards creak beneath the weight of the swaying gentry. Gentlemen in sturdy leather boots and top hats and gentlewomen in ruffled high-collared blouses and plume-adorned fedoras float through an opium haze to the sultry waltz of a cello and accordion. Lovers wearing aviator goggles watch from velvet cushions on the floor. Beneath the barn loft, a mad scientist with a brass monocle concocts libations behind the bar; a sparking Jacob’s ladder illuminates his work. Past the bar, yellowed maps and leather-bound novels lead to a grand dining table filled with slabs of roasted meats and potatoes. Read more…

The Cheers of South Eugene (3.11.10)

Come for the whiskey, stay for the music, leave because you’ve lost at pool.

Mulligans has existed as a bar in some form for more than 60 years, starting as the The Gables in the 1940s. Walk through the door and find a sea of baseball caps, sweatshirts and the occasional bolo tie. A large blond mermaid cutout looks down from above the dark wood bar — her ample bosoms are aquariums that a couple of lucky fish call home. There are two pool tables where you can play a game for 25 cents, video lottery machines lining one wall and a handful of tables with worn chairs that look like they came out of a 1970s airport. Nothing about this place is ironic. If something looks old or vintage, that’s because it is. Read more…

 

Oregon Quarterly

Finally! (Autumn 2011)

 Alexandra Notman, MA ’11, wrote the following story, “Letters from the Past,” about three of the honored athletes—all current UO student affairs staff members.

“The UO had an excellent women’s athletics program but no one knew about it,” says Peg Rees ’77, MS ’91, leaning back in a desk chair at her Esslinger Hall office. The former UO athlete, who played basketball, volleyball, and softball in the 1970s, has a framed felt yellow “O” proudly hanging in the middle of one wall—the letter she was awarded retroactively at the special ceremony at the Matthew Knight Arena on May 7. “Looking back, we had one of the best programs in the U.S. But that’s hindsight.” Read more…

 

Seattle Metropolitan Magazine

Safe Arbor (November 2010)

A sylvan sanctuary brings the Danilchik family back to nature.

The Danilchik family lives in a Swiss chalet that hovers between two centenarian Western Red cedars and overlooks a tidal strait near Port Orchard Bay. Raccoons on the hunt for table scraps scurry up a wooden ramp that rises 50 feet above the spongy forest floor and leads to the front door. They aren’t welcome inside, where a plumed felt hat and a pair of skeleton keys hang on coat hooks and plump armchairs sit next to a bookshelf filled with European folklore–Swiss Family Robinson, Heidi. (There’s also a worn copy of The Giving Tree.) The phrase ” Traumen sie auf …” is painted above a doorway. Read more…

Kombucha Culture (November 2010)

Fans of fermented tea are brewing their own at home.

Last July, shops that stocked kombucha, a fermented tea touted for its health benefits, pulled the trendy beverage from shelves. The move mystified customers—kombucha’s popularity has soared in recent years, with annual sales estimates ranging from $100 million to $300 million. Why deny folks their funky health juice, especially when they’re willing to pay up to $6 for a 16-ounce bottle? Turns out, some commercial kombuchas exceeded 0.5 percent alcohol per volume, making them boozy enough for the Food and Drug Administration to take notice. But before the FDA could slap on warning labels and an alcohol tax, shopkeepers simply put the kibosh on kombucha. Read more…

Wiki Geek (October 2010)

The hacker behind the biggest info breach in recent military history speaks.

“Where are you?” the voice asked over the phone. “Okay, I’ll be there in five minutes. I’m wearing red shoes.” Moments later, Jacob Appelbaum, WikiLeaks’ most infamous volunteer, appeared in the doorway of a Capitol Hill coffee shop he begged us not to name, scarlet Converse on his feet. Read more…

In the Key of Glee (October 2010)

Seattle’s favorite song and dance comedy is back – and it has company.

As if Glee fever in these parts wasn’t hot enough—the 1,000-person Glee flashmob in Seattle last spring, West Seattle High alum Rosanna Pansino playing a cheerleader in a recent episode, and the production of Puppets Gone Glee at Market Theater—along comes Darren McCoy, a real-life version of the musical comedy-drama’s fictional choir director Will Schuester. Read more…

Something Fishy (October 2010)

Four finned feasts to fork with caution.

Dave McBride knows his fish. As the “fish guy” at the Washington State Department of Health, the toxicologist can talk sockeye and chinook and mercury levels like a Cousteau without spoiling your appetite. When the state department of ecology announced this past summer that our local waters are unusually contaminated with toxins—and may affect freshwater creatures prized by fishing and crabbing enthusiasts—we caught up with the gill whisperer to get him to dish on, well, what could end up on your dish. Read more…

 

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